Submission Guidelines


TWAILR welcomes original full-length journal articles as well as short reflections on international law, comparative law, and transnational law from the perspectives of the Third World, Global South, and Fourth World.

TWAILR reserves the right to publish pieces at the discretion of the Editorial Collective. We particularly welcome authors whose voices are marginalized in knowledge production about law and society. Hence TWAILR follows a publication strategy that prioritizes such voices and provides editorial assistance to this end. We do not tolerate sexism, racism, fascism, classism, homophobia, ableism, and other abuses of power contrary to TWAILR aims and values. TWAILR takes a conscious stance against directly or indirectly normalizing such conduct.

Please follow these instructions for submitting full-length journal articles or short reflections.

Articles

  • While TWAILR aims to accept submissions in multiple languages, our present capacity is limited to English. If your submission is in a language other than English, please contact editors@twailr.com in advance to inquire about our capacity to provide quality peer-reviewing and editing in your language and we will do our best to accommodate you.
  • Articles must be original and not be submitted, accepted, or published elsewhere.
  • There is a zero-tolerance policy towards plagiarism. Manuscripts are screened for plagiarism and, if found, manuscripts will be rejected at any stage of processing. In case an article is already published when plagiarism is detected, it will be retracted, and authors’ institutions may be notified.
  • Submissions should range between 8,000 to 10,000 words, including footnotes.
  • Submissions should include an abstract of 200 words and five key words.
  • Please follow our Style Guide below on language, format, and citation.
  • Selection Process:
    • TWAILR is a peer-reviewed journal.
    • After initial editorial assessment, authors are informed within three weeks of submission whether their article proceeds to peer-review.
    • Submissions are edited for accessibility and clarity and contributors should be open to considering editorial suggestions for changes.
    • Selected articles are anonymized and sent to two independent experts for peer-review.
    • After peer-review is complete, editors inform authors of their final decision.
    • All decisions to publish require unanimity from the Editorial Collective.
  • Please submit your original article in Word document format to submissions@twailr.com

Short Reflections:

  • TWAILR welcomes short reflections on international law, comparative law and transnational law issues from the perspectives of the Third World, Global South, and Fourth World. The short reflection format is particularly well-suited to year-around timely publication on topical contemporary issues.
  • These should be no longer than 3,000 words, written in an accessible style, and lightly referenced.
  • While TWAILR aims to accept reflections in multiple languages, our present capacity is limited to English. If your submission is in a language other than English, please contact editors@twailr.com in advance to inquire about our capacity to provide quality editing in your language and we will do our best to accommodate you.
  • Reflections must be original and not be submitted, accepted, or published elsewhere.
  • There is a zero-tolerance policy towards plagiarism. Manuscripts are screened for plagiarism and, if found, manuscripts will be rejected at any stage of processing. In case a reflection is already published when plagiarism is detected, it will be retracted, and authors’ institutions may be notified.
  • Please follow our Style Guide below on language, format, and citation.
  • Selection Process:
    • Short reflections are subject to editorial review.
    • Reflections that form part of special symposia will be subject to review by guest-editors as well.
    • Reflections are edited for accessibility and clarity and contributors should be open to considering editorial suggestions for changes.
    • All decisions to publish require unanimity from the Editorial Collective.
  • Please submit your original article in Word document format to submissions@twailr.com

Style Guide

TWAILR endeavors to maintain academic rigor alongside ease for authors. Ultimately, we aim for a consistent and easy to follow citation style, with awareness that standardization can be hegemonic. We are presently only able to accept submissions in English but aim to accept submissions in other languages in future. If you are interested in submitting pieces in other languages, please contact TWAILR and we will do our best to accommodate you in future. This style guide is for submissions in English:

1.         Headings

Eliminate all headings which do not add to clarity. Headings should not be numbered but should be coded in the margin A, (a) or (i) to indicate the level of importance.

2.         Spelling and punctuation

Due to unbridgeable differences we accept submissions that use “s” (decolonise) or “z” (decolonize) provided that they do so consistently. The same applies to “-or” and “-our” (“labor” and “labour”). While transliterations can be contested, we aim to follow local spelling as far as possible (so it is Hawai’i, not Hawaii).

3.         Quotations

Quotations should be indicated by single quotation marks. Where a quotation is more than three lines long, it should be indented with a line space above and below, and with no quotation marks. Points of ellipsis should not be used to open the quote.

4.         Italics

Italics are to be used for emphasis in a measured way.

5.         Acronyms and abbreviations

Acronyms may be used provided that the name is set out in full, followed by the abbreviation in brackets at the first usage. For example: New International Economic Order (NIEO).

6.         Citation format

Books
Antony Anghie, Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (CUP, 2005) 123-126.

Edited volumes
Luis Eslava, Michael Fakhri & Vasuki Nesiah (eds.), Bandung, Global History and International Law: Critical Pasts and Pending Futures (CUP, 2017).

Chapters in edited books
Vanja Hamzić, International Law as Violence: Competing Absences of the Other’ in Dianne Otto (ed.), Queering International Law: Possibilities, Alliances, Complicities, Risks (Routledge, 2017) 77, at 78.

Articles
Obiora Chinedu Okafor, ‘Praxis and the International (Human Rights) Law Scholar: Toward the Intensification of Twailian Dramaturgy’ (2016) 33:3 Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice 1, at 6.

Online material
Oxfam, ‘Public Good or Private Wealth?’ (January 2019) https://www.oxfam.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/bp-public-good-or-private-wealth-210119-en.pdf (accessed 10 April 2019).

Selected international law materials
– Art. 2(4) UN Charter.
– UNGA Res. 26/25 (XXV), 24 October 1970.
– UNSC Res. 1441(2002), 8 November 2002. 
Legality of the Threat or the Use of Nuclear Weapons, Advisory Opinion, 8 July 1996, 226, https://www.icj-cij.org/files/case-related/95/095-19960708-ADV-01-00-EN.pdf (accessed 10 April 2019).

Subsequent Citations
Second and subsequent citations of a single publication should be in short form:
– Anghie (2005) 80.

‘Ibid’ is used where there are two or more consecutive references to the same work; ‘ibid, 25’ where the page number differs:
– Anghie (2005) 80.
– Ibid.
– Ibid, 169.